5 Tips for your 2020 Mid-Year Reflection

Published by Tiffany Persaud on

5 Tips for Your 2020 Mid-Year Reflectio

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I think it’s safe to say 2020 has not gone in the direction any of us could have planned. It’s been a long and hectic six months, to say the least. So, what about those resolutions you set back in January? If you’re like us, you probably haven’t thought about them since you wrote them down in the beginning of the year. But, as we’re almost half-way through the year, it’s a good time to sit down for a 2020 Mid-Year Reflection.

Why do a 2020 Mid-Year Reflection?

By taking a step back to review the goals we set at the beginning of the year, we can set the stage for success later on. It can be easy to forget about our goals with the busyness of our own lives. We get so caught up in dealing with one task after the other, that we forget to look at the whole picture. By carving out some time to reflect, we can focus on our longer term goals.

Additionally our goals may need to change. Whether it be our travel goals or financial goals that have taken a hit, our plans are not immune to the outside world. As such, the goals we set back in January have likely been impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. Luckily, none of our goals are static. We can change them and adapt them as we need. A mid-year reflection allows us to do just that; to change our goals in a structured way.

ALSO READ: 10 Reasons Why The Law of Attraction Isn’t Working For You

Now that you know the importance of conducting a mid-year reflection, you can smash yours with these great tips.

5 Tips for your 2020 Mid-Year Reflection

1. Celebrate all that you’ve learned and achieved so far.

Start your reflection by reviewing your accomplishments for the year. A lot has happened over the last six months, that has likely changed you as a person. Whether you’ve overcome tough financial challenges or simply learned to make whipped coffee, you need to celebrate. First, make a list of all of you accomplishments. No matter how big or small, be sure to include them all. If you’re struggling to remember all of your successes, think about your highlights of year or challenges you’ve overcome so far.

2. Be honest about what you want.

The person you were back in January is not the same person you are today. Looking for proof? Just check your achievements list. The person you were a few months ago had none of these experiences under their belt! With all of these experiences, your outlook and view have likely been impacted. As a result, you should rethink the goals you set. Ask yourself questions such as:

  • Do I feel differently than I did at the beginning of the year?
  • Are my goals helping me grow into the person I want to be?
  • What do I want to cultivate the rest of the year?

By answering these questions, you can assess whether you are going in the direction you want, or if you need to redirect your goals. Keep the goals that work with your future and scrap the ones that don’t.

3. Be critical of the year so far.

Now that you know exactly what you want for your future, you can assess what’s worked so far and what hasn’t. If you haven’t stuck to the goals you made yourself, it may be time to switch tactics. In Atomic Habits, James Clear discusses the importance of our systems of change. He suggests that it’s not our goals that fail, but the process we use to achieve our goals that fails. When we have a process that causes friction in our lives, we’re less likely to achieve the associated goal. Let’s say your goal is to get fit. Maybe waking up for a morning jog isn’t your thing. It’s hard to wake up early and plus, it’s cold outside. So finding something that fits your schedule might be a better solution, like a lunch-time yoga class.

Taking time to analyze what isn’t working is an important step in your mid-year reflection. By reviewing the system of change for your goals, you can increase your chance of success. If you’re interested in creating goals that stick, I highly recommend Atomic Habits by James Clear. Clear offers a four step process for breaking bad behaviors in favour of good ones. He shows how small, incremental, everyday routines compound and add up to massive, positive change over time.

4. Embrace changes.

Let’s take a moment to see what you’ve accomplished in this mid-year reflection so far. By now you’ve celebrated your achievements, gotten rid of goals that don’t align with your future, and you’ve strengthen the goals that do. Now it’s time to develop new goals. Just because it isn’t beginning of  the year doesn’t mean you can’t set new goals. Think of the mid-year like a mini new year. You have the chance to redo your goals and start over. Set new goals that align with your future self. Remember, just setting goals is not the answer. It’s also important to ensure you have a clear process to action out these goals.

You can take it a step further, by scheduling monthly check-ins. Carve out time each month to re-evaluate your goals. Start by assessing whether your systems of change are working or if they need to be adjusted. Constantly upgrading your goals will allow you to be more in-tune with your long-term plans. Additionally, you’ll know you took all steps possible to achieve your goals.

5. End with positive affirmations.

Congratulations, you’ve just completed a total overhaul of your yearly goals! That was no small feat. The final tip for your 2020 mid-year reflection is to end with a positive state of mind. Plus, with the way 2020 is going, we all need a little more positivity in our lives.

Try saying some of the following affirmations out loud:

  • I trust in my ability to achieve anything I undertake.
  • My strength is greater than any struggle.
  • I will never give up on my goals and dreams.

 

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